Tag Archives: Injections

BOTOX for Babies: Part 3- Ice, Ice Baby

Have you been nervous to try an injectable because of bruising or discomfort? Read on…

There is a TOTAL laundry list of ways to avoid little bruises or lessen the slight (and temporary) discomfort from an injectable cosmetic treatment, but here is one of my tips based on my experiences in the office:

She’s as cold as ice:

Pressing a cold pack onto the area for 5 or 10 minutes before your procedure usually means vasoconstriction –so those little blood vessels are running for their lives, not begging to be hit with an injection (this is what causes bruising). BONUS: it helps dull the sensation, too!

Icing afterward will also prevent or reduce swelling, which is helpful as well. The cold reduces blood flow to the injury and can limit the size of the bruise. Additionally, the cold will decrease the inflammation (this IS an injury, after all) and reduce any swelling that you might have.

5-15 minutes on, and 5-15 minutes off with a cold pack can be helpful after an injection… so if you’re checking your email or watching Netflix when you get home, grab a cold one! (a cold pack, that is!)

So, I think it'd be more helpful on your face, you guys.  But, whatever blows your hair back, I suppose...

So, I think it’d be more helpful on your faces, you guys.
But, whatever blows your hair back, I suppose…

Your doc will likely have specific instructions for you, including post-care. Please note: this is post is simply meant to be fun and informative, *not the authority on your health* so please always follow your doctors instructions… and NOT what you read on the internet. (yes, this blog included!)

Keep in mind that there are always risks to every procedure, so chat it up with your physician to make sure these procedures are appropriate for you… Until Next time: Stay safe, and fabulous!

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BOTOX for Babies: PART 2- Just give me the drugs, Doc!

Have you been nervous to try an injectable because of bruising or discomfort? Read on…

There is a TOTAL laundry list of ways to avoid little bruises or lessen the slight (and temporary) discomfort from an injectable cosmetic treatment, but here is one of my tips based on my experiences in the office:

“Missed me, missed me, now you have to kiss me!”  -your blood vessels

Even if you’re a Seasoned Injection Veteran who’s not so concerned with discomfort, I believe you should ask for the topical anesthetic (if you’re not allergic or have other contraindications).

Why? Your doctor might use a topical anesthetic called LET (4% lidocaine, 1:2000 epinephrine, 0.5% tetracaine) which constricts blood vessels. This means that the blood vessels can kind of shrink up and there’s less of a chance of hitting them. I think it’s a win/win: less discomfort, and less of a chance of the dreaded bruise.

Now, this part is purely anecdotal, and just my opinion based on what I’ve personally seen in the office: but I think even topical anesthetic without the epinephrine can help prevent bruises. So, if your doctor’s office doesn’t use LET, I would still ask for the BLT (20% benzocaine, 6% lidocaine, 4% tetracaine) or similar. I haven’t read anywhere that these other compounded topicals are actually proven vaso-constrictors, but if you try it, let me know what you think! Hey, at least it won’t hurt!

Missed me!! Beep Beep! (With LET, your vessels can be the roadrunner!!)

Missed me!! Beep Beep!
(With LET, your vessels can be less of a target and more like the roadrunner!!)

Your doc will likely have specific instructions for you, including post-care. Please note: this is post is simply meant to be fun and informative, *not the authority on your health* so please always follow your doctors instructions… and NOT what you read on the internet. (yes, this blog included!)

Keep in mind that there are always risks to every procedure, so chat it up with your physician to make sure these procedures are appropriate for you… Until Next time: Stay safe, and fabulous!

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BOTOX for Babies: Part 1- Thin is not always in

Have you been nervous to try an injectable because of bruising or discomfort? Read on…

There is a TOTAL laundry list of ways to avoid little bruises or lessen the slight (and temporary) discomfort from an injectable cosmetic treatment, but here is one of my tips based on my experiences in the office:

Avoid blood-thinning meds and supplements:

Why? Because when the blood is thin, it can flow out of an injured capillary pretty fast, causing a pretty solid new purple beauty mark! Check out my post on what causes a bruise here. This most commonly means avoiding things like:

Ibuprofen

Aspirin

Alcohol

Herbal teas (and Green or Chinese teas)

Gingko

Vitamin E

Fish Oil/Omega 3’s

Medications like Plavix and Warfarin

(There should be a complete list of these blood thinning elements and other contraindications available at your doctor’s office.)

Try to avoid any drugs/supplements known to thin blood for about 5 or 7 days beforehand. However, you should talk to your doctor (don’t just stop because you read a blog!) if you are on those Rx blood thinners, as you’ll want their professional direction about risk vs. benefit.

Don't Pop that (Omega 3) Pill the week before your injection!

Don’t Pop that (Omega 3) Pill the week before your injection!

This is not a complete list of meds to avoid… and your doc will likely have specific post-care instructions for you. This is post is simply meant to be fun and informative- not the authority on your health, so please always follow your doctors instructions, and NOT what you read on the internet! (yes, this blog included!!)

Keep in mind that there are always risks to every procedure, so chat it up with your physician to make sure these procedures are appropriate for you… Stay safe, and fabulous!

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Bruise News: What causes a Bruise?

A Bruise will occur when a blood vessel becomes injured… so like, when you bump into something. Or, in the case of a cosmetic injectable procedure: when a needle ‘bumps into’ a blood vessel.

Uh, You should have seen the other guy??

Uh, You should have seen the other guy??

The blood that was hanging out in there is suddenly free to flow into the tissue surrounding the vessel. It’s worse if your blood is thinned by medications or supplements, as it takes longer to stop flowing out, and there is more blood to collect. This is what you see when you observe that lovely bruise-darkness through the skin.

Bruises are normally harmless, and go away gradually. Generally, the chances of getting a bruise from a cosmetic procedure are lower if:

-You’re not on blood thinners or supplements that can thin the blood

-Your injector is very experienced (though it can happen any time, no matter who injects you!)

-You’re not on steroids (like prednisone) which can make your blood vessels fragile

-You avoid using corticosteroids, as it can make the skin thinner and less protective of those capillaries.

If you do get a bruise, try to keep your head up (sleep with an extra pillow at night) as gravity can help the blood drain from the area, and keep swelling to a minimum.

Stay tuned for more info on bruise-prevention in a series of posts on injectable-procedure tips for wussies! And until next time, stay fabulous my friends!

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Fillers, without the ouch: Dermasculpt Cannulas

"I think next time I'll ask for a micro cannula..."

“I think next time I’ll ask for a micro cannula…”

When a physician uses a blunt-tipped cannula to administer a soft-tissue filler like Juvederm, Radiesse, Restylane, Perlane or other, they are using a blunt-ended, usually flexible, straw-shaped tool to move around the area. This tool allows the injector to lay little threads of the filler product smoothly and evenly.

The key point here is that blunt-tipped micro cannulas are not sharp. When the filler is administered with one, the tissue is not pierced through or poked like it would with a ‘regular’ needle. The physician or nurse will be sliding the cannula in through a tiny pin-point opening that they create (in an inconspicuous place like the corners of the mouth). Then they’ll thread/glide the cannula through the tissue, smoothly filling the area with the product. Additionally, they do not have to pierce through the surface skin multiple times like they would with a needle. This means less possibility of bruising for you!

Have a low beauty-tolerance? Micro cannulas could be your new best friend.

Have a low beauty-tolerance? Micro cannulas could be your new best friend.

It’s also less painful, and you’ll typically end up with much less swelling. Here’s a great study from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, if you’d like to check that out. They did a 2 week comparison of post-injection ‘downtime’ of needles and micro-cannulas. They conclude that cannulas are the way to go!

l personally would describe the feeling as “weirdzies” versus “OUCH!!”. You can certainly feel something moving around, which is why I describe it more as a strange sensation, and not really a pain sensation. I’ve personally tried the Dermasculpt Cannula, which seems to be a great product. Dermasculpt cannulas have pretty much become the standard for soft-tissue filler treatment at Cadella Medical Spa and Wellness Center here in Chicago, so it’s the brand I’m most familiar with.

Even though blunt-tipped cannulas are a fantastic way to have a soft-tissue filler injected, not all docs use them. They can be much more expensive than regular needles, and training is needed (there is a learning curve, as I understand).  It’s also important to know that even if they utilize cannulas for injections in their practice, sometimes an injector will choose to use a traditional needle. It can depend on the product being used, because some fillers are thicker or thinner than others. It also depends on and what the injector wants to do with it, and where they’d like to put it, so it won’t be appropriate all the time. Chat it out with your injector to see if you’re a good candidate for blunt tipped micro cannulas at your next treatment.

Check out my other post on Dermasculpt and uplift filler technique here, and until next time: stay fabulous my friends!

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ZITS: 5 Break-Glass-In-Case-Of-Emergency Tricks

As I sit here with a blemish so large that I may end up naming him (Thor? Steve? Brutus?), about to get my Kenalog Injection, it occurred to me that I may want to share a few of my emergency acne treatment ideas.

Yes, it’s true. Even the skincare-obsessed (and skincare professional) will get the occasional blemish. If you are like me, you might have a fabulous dermatologist in your back pocket.  A quick and almost-painless injection of a steroid and will have you like new in 24-48 hours. What I have is called Kenalog- it’s a glucocorticoid corticosteroid meant for intralesional, (meaning: in-the-zit-itself), injection.

This is one of the best ‘break glass in case of emergency’ treatments before weddings/prom/reunions. There’s risk of a scar when you have these injections, so talk it out with your doc. Sometimes the blemish itself threatens a scar, like when it’s big enough to have its own name. So depending on your situation, despite the risk you may still opt for the shot.

Don’t have a derm? No time for an appointment?

Here are 5 of my top at-home emergency blemish treatments:

Acne Arsenal: Here are a handful of my fave blemish-fighters

Acne Arsenal: Here are a handful of my fave blemish-fighters

Over-the-counter hydrocortisone: 

(I prefer the cream version, but it’s also available in an ointment form) you can apply hydrocortisone 1% a couple times a day for up to 7 days to help reduce inflammation and redness.

Ice, Ice, Baby (better yet, cool packs):

Reduce inflammation by holding a cool pack on for 15 minutes at a time, or as long as is comfortable. It’s good to do while you’re checking email or watching a movie.

Don't forget your 20% off coupon! Super Cutie Cool Packs at Bed, Bath, & Beyond

Don’t forget your 20% off coupon! Super Cutie Cool Packs at Bed, Bath, & Beyond

Tretinoin (aka Retin-a):

If you have some of this (generally for use all over the facial skin at night) I have found that if you use a dab during the day, it can help to flatten things out a bit faster. Tretinoin is typically for anti-aging and /or acne treatment and prevention- it’s a power house prescription. If you don’t happen to have any laying around, Salicylic Acid is always a good one to dry and flatten things out. I love Obagi’s Clenziderm MD Pore Therapy.

Anti-histamines:

Try taking Benedryl or Claritin, if its appropriate for you (i.e, your md says you’re good to go) … It’s all about reducing the inflammation!

Um, yuck. Murder those anaerobic bacteria jerks with BPO

Um, yuck. Murder those anaerobic bacteria jerks with BPO

BPO:

Benzoyl Peroxide products are awesome for prevention and treatment of the pustule-type of lesions… the yucky ones with the ‘head’ on them. This is because BPO works by bringing oxygen in to murder the anaerobic (O2-hating) bacteria in the follicles. A crazy awesome Rx version is called Acanya, otherwise my fave and most-recommended BPO is Obagi’s Therapeutic Lotion.

Of course, always follow the recommendations of your own skin care professional or physician- and may the force be with you!

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